What We Do

THE RAINCATCHER MISSION STATEMENT

RainCatcher is dedicated to healing communities by providing clean water for children in the developing world using affordable and sustainable solutions.

We realize the magnitude of the matter that we are trying to address and believe that setting attainable goals is the best way in achieving and helping make a difference. We have set a 1-5-10 mission in motion in accordance with the United Nations Millennium Development Program, which plans to address achieving eight anti-poverty goals by 2015 including providing clean water.

RainCatcher can help 1 percent or 10 million people gain access to clean drinking water. Currently, our systems have been setup in Kenya, Uganda and Haiti. Our hope is to diversify and spread across the globe to other third world countries that need clean drinking water as well. Most importantly, one of our main mission’s focuses will be on education. We will plan on teaching individuals not only how to use our RainCatcher system, but also enlighten them about the diseases that can arise through drinking adulterated water. We believe education will make individuals realize the consequences of their actions, which will hopefully impel them to make changes & manage independently, without the constant aid and support of others – providing them with hope and a sense of determination.

RAIN WATER HARVESTING

Harvesting rainwater makes good sense. It doesn’t contain the dissolved minerals and salts typically found in the well water you might be using to supplement your outdoor water needs. Rain is a good source of water that would otherwise become polluted runoff picking up chemicals and other dangerous waste as it caroms down streets and gutters on its way to a network of storm drains or the nearest low-lying body of water.

There is evidence that collecting rainwater in cisterns was a common practice in the Middle East more than 4,000 years ago, and its origins probably go back much farther than that. In arid climates, or on islands like Gibraltar that lack river systems, trapping and storing large volumes of rainwater is a practical necessity.

SEE OUR PROJECTS

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